Robert Anda, MD, MS

Rob Anda lives in Atlanta with his wife (Kim) and two children, Kelsey and Will.

Dr. Anda graduated from Rush Medical College in 1979 and received his Board Certification in Internal Medicine in 1982.  He holds a Masters Degree (MS) in Epidemiology and served for two years in the Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) Epidemic Intelligence (EIS) Service.  

He has conducted research in a variety of areas including disease surveillance, behavioral health, mental health and disease, cardiovascular disease, and the effects of childhood stress on health and social functioning.

After spending 20 years as a research medical officer at the CDC he is now a Senior Scientific Consultant to the CDC in Atlanta.  He is frequently asked to consult with local, state, national, and international organizations about ACE Study Concepts.

He played the principal role in the design of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study and serves as its Co-Principal Investigator.  Findings from the ACE Study have been presented at Congressional Briefings and numerous conferences around the world.  The ACE Study is being replicated in numerous countries by the World Health Organization (WHO) and is now being used to assess the childhood origins of health and social problems in more than 18 U.S. states.

He has many publications and has received numerous awards and recognition for scientific achievements.

Connie Au, MSW

Training, Education and Experience:  Master of Social Work from the Universitty of Washington in 1991.  Certified Child Mental Health Specialist and Asian and Pacific Islander Minority Specialist.  Employed at Harborview/Children's Response Center (CRC) since April 2000.  Practice orientation at CRC emphasizes trauma focused cognitive behavioral therapy with children, youth and families impacted by sexual victimization, child abuse, or other traumatic events.  Prior experience working with children and adolescents in various setting including schools, medical clinics and at Seattle Mental Health for 10 years. Special interest in cross-cultural issues in social services and mental health treatment.   

Det. Guy Baker

Detective Guy Baker is a twenty-two year veteran of the Missoula Police Department who has worked the city’s gang activity since its emergence in 1991. Baker was assigned to the police department’s Target Enforcement Unit when it was established in 1994 to target the city’s emerging gang presence. Baker played an integral role in the unit until he transferred to the Detective Division in 2000. Baker works crimes against persons, gang related investigations and is assigned to an FBI Safe Streets Task Force. Baker is a seventeen year member of the Northwest Gang Investigators Association, serving on the executive board for fourteen years and is the Senior Vice President. Baker is the Northwest Regional Representative for the Western States Gang Intelligence Network, an executive board member of the Montana Violent Crime Investigators Association and past member of the Texas Gang Investigators Association and the California Gang Investigators Association. Detective Baker has been a POST certified instructor for the Montana Law Enforcement Academy for fifteen years and has provided instruction on the identification and recognition of street gangs for law enforcement, corrections, schools, and communities across the Northwest.  

Susan Barkan, PhD

Susan Barkan, PhD is the Associate Research Director at Partners for Our Children and is involved in evaluating programs and adapting evidence-based interventions to improve the lives of children and families in the child welfare system. Susan earned a Ph.D. in epidemiology from Yale University and a BA in psychology and biology from Antioch College. She completed a National Institute of Mental Health-funded postdoctoral fellowship in Family Violence at The Children's Hospital in Boston, MA where she also held a faculty appointment in pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. Currently, she serves on the King County Disproportionality Committee.

Chris Billing

Chris Billing is an award-winning documentary filmmaker.  He was writer, producer, director and editor for Lost Sparrow, an intensely personal film about the tragic 1978 deaths of his two adopted Crow Indian brothers.  The film premiered in November 2010 on the nationally-televised PBS series Independent Lens.  Chris has more than two decades of experience as a journalist and documentary filmmaker.  His experience includes more than a decade reporting from China, and a five-year stint as the Beijing bureau chief for NBC News.

Rebecca Benson, RN, MN

Rebecca serves as coordinator for the Early Family Support Services Program and Early Intervention Program for Public Health – Seattle and King County. Rebecca currently serves as trainer for the Promoting First Relationships Program and she trains public health nurses who deliver PFR services in the home. Rebecca has worked for over ten years in public health parent-child health settings with vulnerable families.

Garry Bevel, JD

Garry is currently the Director of the American Bar Association’s (ABA) Commission on Youth at Risk. Garry is also a Staff Attorney with the ABA's Center on Children and the Law: Opening Doors for LGBTQ Youth in Foster Care Project and Staff Director of the Center’s Commission on Youth-at-Risk in Washington, DC. Garry currently serves on the Transgender Youth subcommittee of the Advisory Council of the National Alliance to End Homeless. He is a former Miami-Dade prosecutor and was a litigation attorney for the Florida Guardian ad Litem Program prior to joining the ABA. Garry earned a B.A. from Florida State University and J.D. from UNC - Chapel Hill School of Law. In 2010, Garry was named one of the Best LGBT Lawyers Under 40 by the National LGBT Bar Association. In his spare time he is co-captain of his Stonewall League Kickball team.

Michelle Bogart

Michele Bogart has been with the department for 21 years. For the past 8 years she has been the Children’s Administration’s Health Program Manager. She develops and implements policy and practice targeted to improve health outcomes for children in out-of-home placement.

Eric Bruns, PhD

Eric Bruns is a clinical psychologist and Associate Professor in the Division of Public Behavioral Health and Justice Policy, University of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Bruns spends most of his time researching the impact of community-based services and supports for children with complex needs. Much of his research has focused on developing the wraparound process, a widely-implemented care coordination model for children and youth with complex mental health needs. He is also recognized for his research on school mental health services, services for youth in foster care, and family peer-to-peer support services. Dr. Bruns directs the National Wraparound Initiative, as well as the Wraparound Evaluation and Research Team, which develops and disseminates fidelity measures for the wraparound process. He has presented at dozens of conferences. Dr. Bruns is the Chair of the Board of Advisors of the Research and Training Center for Children’s Mental Health at the University of South Florida and with Eric Trupin, Ph.D., he serves as Editor of the journal Report on Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Youth. He has served as Principal Investigator for several NIMH-funded studies in children’s mental health and authored over 50 refereed journal articles and book chapters.

LaRon Burris

LaRon Burris has facilitated father education and support groups for 5 years and was the facilitator for the Fathers Engagement Project. A veteran father himself, LaRon brings a unique perspective and wealth of experience.

David Burton, PhD, MSW

Dr. Burton is a professor at Smith College School for Social Work in Northampton, MA. His current clinical work is at Northeastern Center for Youth and Families in Easthampton, MA and with the MA Department of Youth Services.

Dr. Burton has worked in the field of sexual aggression for over 20 years, primarily as a clinician with adolescents and children. Dr. Burton researches the childhood victimization and etiology of child, adolescent and adult sexual abusers - current research interests include trauma histories of sexual abusers, nonsexual criminality of sexual abusers, attachment, cognitive behavioral theory and treatment, pornography, substance abuse, self-cessation methods, executive functioning, evidenced based practice, effectiveness of treatment for adolescent sexual abusers, and racial discrimination of sexual abusers.

Dr. Burton has trained in over 35 states and 5 countries. His is known for his breadth of knowledge, humor and compassionate approach to the topic. He is a regular at ATSA, NAPN, the Children’s Justice Conference in Seattle, MASOC/MATSA in MA, and many others.

Dr. Burton has been published over 40 articles in several journals including Child Abuse and Neglect, Victims and Violence, Sexual Aggression, Evidenced Based Social Work, Smith College Studies in Social Work, and Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Practice. Dr. Burton serves on the editorial boards of Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment and is the editor of Smith college Studies in Social Work.

Capt. William Carson, MA

Captain Bill Carson has thirty-two years experience as a police officer in the St. Louis metropolitan area. He is currently a commander with the Maryland Heights (MO) Police Department, serves as a Deputy Commander with the Major Case Squad of Greater St. Louis, and is a member of the Missouri State Child Fatality Review Panel. He has a Masters Degree in Criminology & Criminal Justice from the University of Missouri.

Sgt. Dave Cortez

Sergeant David Cortez has served with the Yakima Police Department for eighteen years. During his tenure, Cortez has been a patrol officer, major crimes detective, SWAT team member, SRO supervisor, and coordinator for the department’s Gang Resistance Education and Training (GREAT) program. Cortez has also attended hundreds of hours of training in gang investigations, prevention and intervention around the country and is currently assigned to the patrol division. Born in Mexico and raised in California, Cortez grew up dealing with street gangs in his neighborhood and gained valuable insight to the gang life style. Due to his unique personal and professional experiences, Cortez was instrumental in the development and implementation of the Yakima Police Department’s Gang Unit and has investigated dozens of gang related homicides and other violent crimes perpetuated by gangs. Cortez recognizes the importance of public trust and support and has made it a priority to reach out to the public by providing vital information about street gangs and crime prevention in order to build stronger community relations. Sergeant Cortez is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps who served in the Middle East during operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm.  

Benjamin Danielson, MD

Richard Delaney, PhD

Dr. Rick Delaney is an internationally known clinical psychologist, speaker and consultant to foster, kinship, and adoptive parents and programs.  He has most recently been the clinical director of a community-based residential treatment center for traumatized, multiply impacted, emotionally disturbed children in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. For many years, Dr. Delaney has been a consultant to the Casey Family Programs and other foster care and adoption agencies across the county. He is the author (or co-author) of several books in the area of foster care and adoption, including:

Fostering Changes: Myth, Meaning, and Magic Bullets in Attachment Theory

Behavior with a Purpose: Thoughtful Solutions to Common and Uncommon Problems of Foster and Adopted Children and Youth

A 3-D View of Foster, Kinship, and Adopted Children

Dr. Delaney is the principal investigator of Foster Parent College (www.fosterparentcollege.com), an on-line resource for foster and adoptive parents.  This site is rated at the California Evidence Based Clearinghouse in Child Welfare.  See related journal article: Pacifici, C., Delaney, R., White, L., Nelson, C., & Cummings, K. (2006). Web-based training for foster, adoptive, and kinship parents. Children and Youth Services Review, 28, 1329-1343.

Dr. Delaney is the lead faculty member at Portland State University’s on-line training series for mental health professionals to achieve adoption-competence. He is a father, step-father and grandfather and lives in Ft. Collins, Colorado and Austin, Texas.

Michelle Demmert, JD

Michelle Demmert, Tlingit, Eagle Clan, is with Tulalip Tribes Reservation Attorney's Office. Prior to this position, Michelle worked most recently as a CLEAR DV attorney with the Northwest Justice Project. Michelle held various positions with the Northwest Intertribal Court System during her ten years with NICS, including Administrator and Chief Judge and Presiding Judge at the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Tribe. Michelle is a graduate of the University of Washington for both her law degree and her BA in Psychology. Michelle actively engaged in the Alaska commercial fishing industry prior to her practice of law.

Mike Donlin, MA

Mike Donlin has been an educator for decades.  Currently a Program Supervisor in the School Safety Center of the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia, WA, he has taught at all levels and in different locations around the country and the world. He was with Seattle Public Schools for 30 years as a classroom teacher. And program administrator, supervising a variety of programs from TBE/ESL to technology, community technology, and bullying and harassment prevention and intervention.

As a program administrator, Mike managed federal and state grant programs, including a Federal Technology Innovation Challenge Grant, Community Technology Center grants, and Title IID E2T2 technology grants.  In Seattle’s Prevention-Intervention program, Mike implemented bullying prevention programs with an emphasis on Internet safety and cyberbullying.   He oversaw the development of the widely recognized SPS Middle School Cyberbullying Curriculum and more recently wrote five cyberbullying lessons for the Committee for Children’s Steps to Respect program.

In 2008, he received a Qwest/NCMEC Spirit of Online Safety Leadership Award, and is currently a member of the National Cyber Security Alliance K-12 Work Group and an alumnus of the FBI Citizens’ Academy.  Mike was recognized as one of Seattle’s “Most Influential” people of the year in the November 2010 issue of Seattle Magazine. He is also one of the “experts” in the most recent Patching & Hinduja book: Cyberbullying Prevention and Response: Expert Perspectives, Routledge, 2012.

Mike is married and has three digital native children.

Judge Randy Doucet

Randy A. Doucet is a judge for the Northwest Intertribal Court System and other tribal courts in Washington. He is a graduate of Seattle University School of Law. He earned a Master of Judicial Studies Degree from the National Judicial College/ University of Nevada Reno and also earned a Master of Business Administration degree from Tulane University in New Orleans.

Patrick Dowd, JD

Patrick Dowd is an ombudsman with the Washington State Office of the Family and Children's Ombudsman (OFCO).  He worked for OFCO from 1999 to 2005 and rejoined to office in 2010.  Mr. Dowd was also a managing attorney with the Washington State Office of Public Defense (OPD) Parents Representation Program and previously worked as a public defense attorney, representing clients in dependency, termination of parental rights, juvenile offender and adult criminal proceedings. Through his work at OFCO and OPD, Mr. Dowd has extensive professional experience in child welfare law and policy. Mr. Dowd graduated from Seattle University and earned his J.D. at the University of Oregon.

TahTanka Bear Eagle, MSW

TahTanka Bear Eagle is an enrolled member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe from Wounded Knee, South Dakota and received his Master's Degree in Social Work from Eastern Washington University, Cheney WA. He is currently employed by the Kalispel Tribe as the Tribal Foster Care Licensor. He previously worked in Child Protective Services and Child Welfare Services for the Colville Confederated Tribes and for the Kalispel Tribe of Indians. During his time as a Social Worker for these tribes he had testify and been a part of many tribal and state court hearings.de

J. Mark Eddy, PhD

J. Mark Eddy, PhD is the Research Director at Partners for Our Children at the University of Washington School of Social Work.  He specializes in conducting rigorous research studies of prevention and intervention programs intended to benefit children and families. Prior to joining POC, he served as a senior scientist and a licensed psychologist at the Oregon Social Learning Center (OSLC) for 25 years. Mark is an associate editor of the professional journal Prevention Science, and he co-edited the recently published book, Children of Incarcerated Parents: A Handbook for Researchers and Practitioners (Urban Institute Press). He received a B.S. at Texas A&M University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of Oregon.

Ryan Edwards

Dave Everett

Mark Everson, PhD

Mark Everson, PhD is Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he is the Director of the Program on Childhod Trauma and Maltreatment. Dr. Everson has served on both the National Board of Directors and the National Advisory Board of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC). In this capacity, he served as co-director of two APSAC taskforces that developed best practice guidelines on child forensic interviewing, and on the use of anatomical dolls, in cases of alleged sexual abuse. During the last twenty years, Dr. Everson’s professional career has had a primary focus on research and training in the area of child forensic interviewing in cases of alleged abuse.  

Det. Robert Farley, MS

As a highly decorated detective, unit supervisor and Deputy United States Marshal, Robert Hugh Farley has over 28 years experience conducting and supervising all aspects of child abuse investigation - from sexual abuse to child homicide. As an internationally recognized expert, consultant, author and instructor in child abuse investigation techniques Robert Hugh Farley has conducted thousands of child abuse investigation training seminars for the U.S. Department of Justice and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in all 50 states and in 22 different countries for INTERPOL.

Justin Fitzsimmons, JD

Justin Fitzsimmons is a Senior Attorney with NDAA’s National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse in Alexandria, Virginia.  He organizes national conferences each year for technology-facilitated child sexual exploitation. Additionally, he trains at other state and local seminars on the subject of sexual and physical crimes against children. He has also served as a member of working groups Innocence Lost, Restitution for Victims of Child Pornography, and Cyberbullying with other individuals from federal, state and local law enforcement, non-profit organizations and internet safety organizations to develop responses and education to technology-facilitated crimes. 

Prior to coming to NDAA in June of 2009, Mr. Fitzsimmons was an Assistant State’s Attorney in Illinois for 11 years. He was the supervisor of the Special Prosecutions Unit of the Kane County State’s Attorney’s Office, prosecuting cases of arson, elder abuse, complex financial crimes, Internet crimes and public integrity. The unit was responsible for any prosecutions involving online crimes against children. Before supervising SPU he was assigned to the Child Advocacy Center where he prosecuted sexual assault and severe physical abuse of children.  Justin received his law degree from IIT-Chicago-Kent College of Law and his undergraduate degree at Wittenberg University.

Lisa Fontes, PhD

Lisa Aronson Fontes, PhD, has dedicated two decades to making the mental health, social service, and criminal justice systems more responsive to culturally diverse people. She is the author of Interviewing Clients Across Cultures: A Practitioner’s Guide and Child Abuse and Culture: Working with Diverse Families. She has written numerous journal articles and chapters on cultural issues in child maltreatment and violence against women, cross-cultural research, and ethics. She teaches at the University of Massachusetts. She has worked as a family, individual, and group psychotherapist, and has conducted research in Santiago, Chile, and with Puerto Ricans, African Americans, and European Americans in the United States. Dr. Fontes is fluent in Spanish and Portuguese. She is a popular conference speaker and workshop facilitator. Dr. Fontes completed a Fulbright Foundation Grant in Buenos Aires, Argentina. As a volunteer, Dr. Fontes worked for three years with Somali refugees in Springfield, Massachusetts.

Aldo Fusaro, MD

Dr. Fusaro is predominantly a product of the Midwest, completing both his undergraduate and medical school training in Iowa. He completed his residency in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology at Rush-Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago. After completing residency, he underwent forensic pathology fellowship training at the Cook County Medical Examiner's Office. After surviving this, he was offered and took a Deputy ME position, and stayed gainfully employed at the Cook County office for the next 9 years.

In 2005, he accepted a position at the King County Medical Examiner's Office in Seattle, and has practiced there si nce. Dr. Fusaro has presented at National Association of Medical Examiner and American Academy of Forensic Sciences meetings; he has trained medical students, residents and fellows, and has participated in trainings for law enforcement, prosecuting and defense attorneys.

He is very pleased to be on this panel, although he realizes that he is the token forensic pathologist.

Erin Gailey, BA

Erinn Gailey has worked as advocate for survivors of domestic violence for over 10 years.  She began volunteering as a shelter advocate while going to Washington State University - Tri-Cities, and was hired full-time after graduating from WSU with a BA in Sociology & Women's Studies.

She has also worked with domestic violence and sexual assault programs in Utah.  She began working for Domestic Violence Services of Benton & Franklin Counties in 2004 as an advocate and is currently the Program Director for the agency.

Christina Garcia, BA, RN

Christina Garcis, BA, RN currently works as the supervisor of the Fostering Well-Being Care Coordination Unit for ADSA, overseeing the medical needs of children in out-of-home placement. Christina has nearly 20 years of experience in the mental health field. She has worked as a case manager for patients suffering from chronic mental illness, as a individual and family counselor at several community mental health centers in the state of Washington, and as a psychiatric nurse. In 2001, Christina received her RN degree and after working as a psychiatric nurse at Behavioral Health Services in Olympia, came to work for the Department of Social and Health Services.

Julie George, M.Ed

Julie George, M.Ed, is an educational consultant for the UW Autism Center. She received her master's degree in elementary education from Northern Arizona University in 2006. Julie began working with students with autism spectrum disorders and their families in 1997 through ABA home programs, residential group home programs and the public schools. Julie also taught a middle school program for students with ASD in the Bellevue School District.

Meg Goldberg, JD

Meg Goldberg, J.D., is a licensed attorney from Portland, Oregon. She has extensive background which extends over 26 years in litigation, conflict, conciliation, and alternative dispute resolution services. Her five year history and background as a consultant with the National Resource Center for Adoptions has assisted many states and communities with an understanding of adoption law policies and practice. She has worked with birth parents and others concerning their rights relative to permanency planning.  As a staff attorney, she served over five years with the Native American Program – Oregon Legal Services. Other areas of expertise includes adjunct and teaching experiences on a variety of mediation and related legal subjects with universities in Oregon. She is a recognized national presenter and workshop facilitator.

Det. Brad Graham

Deborah Greenleaf, RN, MN

Deborah Greenleaf serves as a public health program lead for families who have child maltreatment concerns and have been referred to Public Health Nursing services by the Washington State DSHS Children's Administration Program. Deborah serves as a trainer for the Promoting First Relationships Program. She regularly trains providers on social-emotional health, child development, infant and young child mental health, children with traumatic exposures to domestic violence, parenting coaching, and relationship development. Deborah has worked for over twenty years in public health parent-child health settings with vulnerable families. Deborah also serves as the coordinator for the King County Domestic Violence and Child Maltreatment Coordinated Response Project which is operated by King County Superior Court.

Natasha Grossman, MSW

Natasha Grossman MSW is a program director at the Community Engagement Initiative, University of Washington, School of Social Work.  Natasha’s experience includes a history of working with vulnerable populations through direct service and policy advocacy.

Natasha served as the Washington State project director for one of four national sites participating in a Quality Improvement Center for Non Resident Fathers. The QIC-NRF sought to increase the engagement of non-resident fathers in the child welfare system by involving them in a peer education curriculum.

Rose M. Handon, PhD, LSW

Rose M. Handon, Ph.D., LSW, is a licensed social worker and retired state human services administrator from OH with over 33 years of experience in child welfare. She is has been a consultant with the National Resource Center for Adoptions for over two years. Her areas of Technical Assistance and Training include: MEPA/IEP; Title IV-E Adoption Assistance; Adoption Support and Preservation (Post Adoption Services); Cultural Competence in Child Welfare; Kinship Adoption; Open Adoption/Permanency Mediation; Older Child and Youth Adoption;   Preparing and Retaining Resource Families; Preparing and Assessing Children and Youth for Adoption; Title IV-E Adoption Assistance; Adoption Support; Child Welfare Policies and Practice; and Preservation (Post Adoption Services). In addition, she serves as an adjunct faculty with Post University (CT); Northern AZ University (AZ); and Indiana Wesleyan University (Central OH).

Richard Harruff, MD, PhD

Richard Harruff, M.D, PhD has been with the Seattle - King County Medical Examiner’s Office since 1993.  Graduating from Indiana University Medical School in 1976, he received postgraduate training at University of Wisconsin, New York University, and University of Tennessee, and is certified in Anatomic, Clinical, and Forensic Pathology by the American Board of Pathology.  He is author of one book and numerous medical and scientific journal articles and has lectured extensively on the topic of infant death investigation.

Ron Hertel

Ron Hertel is the Program Supervisor for Compassionate Schools and Readiness to Learn at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. He received his Bachelor of Science in education in 1974 and did part-time teaching in an inpatient psychiatric work with adolescents prior to beginning a career in social work in Colorado in 1980. In that position he worked with schools and other public agencies providing support for abused and neglected children and their families. In 1989, Ron moved to Washington State to continue his work in child welfare and in 1994 moved to the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services Division of Mental Health as the Administrator of Children's Mental Health Services. In 2000 he moved to the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. As Program Supervisor for Readiness to Learn, he has had the opportunity to shepherd a program that provides support to students and families affected by adversities and trauma and has been a key player in developing The Compassionate Schools Initiative in Washington State.

Judge Anne Hirsh

Judge Anne Hirsch is currently the Presiding Judge at Thurston County Family and Juvenile Court. Judge Hirsch is also the Chair of the Dependency Best Practices Workgroup of the Commission on Foster Care, convened to examine promising practices for dependency work, with the goal of improving outcomes for youth in care. Judge Hirsch was first elected to the bench in 2006. Prior to 2006 she worked for 14 years as a part time family and juvenile court commissioner and had a private law practice where she worked as a guardian ad litem and mediator, in addition to legal work in the areas of family and elder law. Prior to opening her private practice Judge Hirsch worked for many years as a legal services attorney, primarily representing survivors of domestic violence seeking custody. Judge Hirsch was one of the founders of the Thurston County Volunteer Legal Clinic, served on the Thurston County Domestic Violence Fatality Review Board, the Board of Directors of the Thurston County Bar Association; she currently serves on the Board of the Child Care Action Council and the Thurston County Food Bank. Judge Hirsch graduated cum laude from the University of Puget Sound School of Law (now Seattle University) in 1984 and lives in Olympia with her family.

Colleen Holt

Colleen Holt is a member of Microsoft’s Global Criminal Compliance team and has been assisting law enforcement around the world on behalf of Microsoft since June of 2008.  Prior to coming to Microsoft, Colleen was a senior investigator with AOL’s Public Safety and Criminal Investigations team from 2005 to 2008.  Colleen’s criminal compliance work began in 2001 through both Preston Gates and Ellis and then with Al Gidari of Perkins Coie law firm, where she worked with several ISP’s and telecom companies in setting up their criminal compliance ECPA policies.

Sheila Malloy Huber

Sheila Malloy Huber is an Assistant Attorney General and Senior Counsel with the Attorney General's Office in Olympia. She leads a team of attorneys that advises the Department of Social and Health Services' Children's Administration and its Assistant Secretary on a wide range of legal issues. Additionally, the team works with Assistant Attorneys General statewide who represent the Department in dependency and termination litigation and appeals. Sheila is the team leader for the AGO's Juvenile Law Appellate Project. After graduating from law school in 1977, she was in private practice in Spokane for 13 years, emphasizing adoption, family and juvenile law, as well as appellate practice. During that time she also taught legal research and writing at Gonzaga University School of Law. From 1991 to1999, she worked as a law clerk for Chief Justice James Andersen and, later, for Chief Justice Richard Guy, of the Washington State Supreme Court. She joined the Attorney General's Office in 1999.

Jonah Idczak, BA

Jonah Idczak has worked for thirty three years in child welfare in both private and state government agencies including program and case management, supervision, training, facilitation of shared decision meetings and most recently as a father engagement specialist.  For the last three and a half years he has been the father engagement specialist for Children’s Services in King County and is presently working with state, community and tribal staff to develop father engagement strategies.   Mr. Idczak has a BA from The Evergreen State College.

Tim Jaasko-Fisher, JD

Tim Jaasko-Fisher is Director of the Court Improvement Training Academy (CITA) at the University of Washington, School of Law's Child and Youth Advocacy Clinic. Prior to becoming the director of CITA in September 2007, Tim was an Assistant Attorney General for 11 years, representing the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services Children's Administration. He conducts training on a variety of topics relating to child welfare law, litigation of child abuse and neglect cases, and juvenile dependency court improvement. He has presented at the Washington State Children's Justice Conference, Washington State Children's Administration Social Work Academy, and at the Washington State Judicial Conference. He was awarded his Bachelor of Arts in Government from New Mexico State University in 1993, his Juris Doctorate from Seattle University School of Law in 1996 and is currently a Masters candidate in Seattle University's Organization Systems Renewal program.

Randi Jensen, MA, LMHC, CCDCI

Randi is currently Director of The Soldiers Project Northwest, a nonprofit organization providing free confidential counseling for Afghanistan, Iraq, and New Dawn deployed active duty and veteran armed service members and their loved ones (www.thesoldiersproject.org).

With a specialty in treating suicidality, she is a Certified Chemical Dependency Counselor and a Licensed Mental Health Counselor with a counseling practice in Shoreline, WA. She is also adjunct faculty at Bastyr University, Bellevue College, and Antioch University Seattle. Currently Randi is Antioch's Program Coordinator for Case Management Best Practices. In addition to speaking on various mental health subjects, Randi provides instruction in the formation of suicide prevention social support groups based on the protocol she developed, the Jensen Suicide Prevention Peer Protocol, (The JSP3© at www.jsp3.org). Randi is a contributing author to the publication "War Trauma and its Wake" due to be published by Routledge (Jan 2013). She is also author of a book on chronic suicidality, "Just Because You're Suicidal Doesn't Mean You're Crazy," (expected E-publish date June 2012) .

Kathy Jenson

Kathy Jensen is a staff attorney in the Colville office of Northwest Justice Project, a program providing free civil legal services to low income people throughout the state of Washington. Kathy's area of practice includes public benefits, Native American public benefits, Special Education law, Administrative Law, Family Law, and Tribal Law. Kathy practices in Spokane Tribal Court and Colville Tribal Court, as well as Superior Court in Stevens, Ferry, and Pend Oreille Counties. She is a descendent of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana, an active member of the Spokane Local Indian Child Welfare Advisory Committee (LICWAC), as well as a grandmother of five!

Kim Keltch, MSW

Deb Kennedy

Andrea Khoury, JD

Andrea Khoury, JD is the director of the ABA Youth at Risk Bar-Youth Empowerment Project focusing on adolescent's access to attorneys, children's right to counsel, and youth involvement in court hearings. She is also an Assistant Director of Child Welfare for the National Child Welfare Resource Center on Legal and Judicial Issues. As part of her position she provides technical assistance to states on issues dealing with the Adoption and Safe Families Act, Child and Family Service Reviews, and other child welfare legislation. Among other topics, she provides numerous trainings across the country on adolescent permanency, the role of the child's representative, involving youth in dependency proceedings, and representing lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth. She managed the writing, editing, and production of the ABA publication, Achieving Permanency for Adolescents in Foster Care: A Guide for Legal Professionals as well as authoring several chapters. She co-authored the ABA publication, Opening Doors for LGBTQ Youth in Foster Care: A Guide for Lawyers and Judges. She has represented children in abuse and neglect cases for over 10 years.

 

Lori Koolman

Lori A. Kooiman. I have been a Deputy Prosecuting Attorney with Pierce County for twelve years. I have been assigned to the Special Assault Unit for the past eight years. My area of focus is prosecution of crimes against children, both physical and sexual abuse. I am currently serving as the Assistant Team Chief of the Special Assault Unit.

Dan Knoepfler, MC

Dan Knoepfler is a Masters Level therapist and Certified Sex Offender Treatment Provider practicing in south King County.   He received his undergraduate degree in psychology  at the University of Washington in 1986.   Upon graduating he worked at a residential treatment center for adolescent males.   About half of the residents had been in trouble for engaging in sexually inappropriate behaviors.  Providing family therapy and reunification under the supervision of a Masters level therapist were a significant part of his job.   After 7 years working in residential treatment he earned his Masters degree in Counseling from Seattle University.   He worked at an outpatient mental health clinic which provided services to adolescents with sexual behavior problems.  In 1997 he started his own private practice, continuing to work with teens, but also adults with sexual behavior problems.   Working with families when sexual abuse has occurred continues to be one of the most rewarding aspects of his current work in the mental health field.

Sara Larsen

Terry Lee, MD

Terry Lee, MD is a child and adolescent psychiatrist and Assistant Professor in the Division of Public Behavioral Health and Justice Policy, in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He is interested in the development, evaluation and dissemination of effective practices. He is a consultant to the Harborview Foster Care Assessment Program and Co-Chair of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Adoption and Foster Care Committee.

Amanda Lewis

Amanda Lewis is a volunteer in the prevention and education program at Harborview Children's Response Center.  As a survivor of child sexual abuse, she found healing in art.  Her art has evolved into the “Survivor’s Journey” art exhibitions, showing across Western Washington, and now at CJC.   Amanda realized that her art could help others in their road to recovery as well as offer insight to those who work with sexual assault survivors.  She currently works as a volunteer firefighter and emergency medical technician.

Sean Lewis, BA

Sean Lewis, a Tacoma native, is the President of Change the Game LLC and SCL Consulting based out of Houston, Texas. Mr. Lewis specializes in providing professional development seminars for businesses, law enforcement agencies, and schools. Mr. Lewis has had the opportunity to speak in 12 states. He has worked with law enforcement agencies including Rikers Island in New York and the Houston Police Department. Mr. Lewis also worked with businesses such as Starbucks and Microsoft. In addition, he has spoken at over 250 schools nationwide. 

Mr. Lewis was the Executive Director of the Law Enforcement Achievement Education Program for the Pierce County Sheriff's Department in Tacoma, Washington. He is a motivational speaker and was the Keynote Speaker for the 2005 Pierce County Gang Conference.

Mr. Lewis played college football where he had a brief opportunity to pursue a pro career. Mr. Lewis trains high school, college, and professional athletes and helps provide scholarship opportunities through his non-profit organization, the Second Half Foundation. Mr. Lewis graduated from Central Washington University.

Mr. Lewis' website is www.changethegame44.com

Fran Lexcen, PhD

Maureen Marcenko, PhD

Maureen Marcenko, PhD, conducts research regarding the well-being of vulnerable children and families, with an emphasis on the development and testing of intervention techniques within the child welfare system.  She is currently examining parent engagement and empowerment strategies and has a longstanding interest in children’s mental health.  Maureen is a Research Fellow at partners for Our Children and an Associate Professor at the University of Washington School of Social Work.  She earned a bachelor's and a master's in social work at Wayne State University, and a Ph.D. in social welfare from McGill University.

Scott "Q" Marcus

Scott "Q" Marcus has lost 2,327 pounds – IF you add up all the weight he has lost (and regained) since he entered the planet at 9 pounds 14 ounces. In 1993 he lost 70 pounds, which he has maintained to this date, making him the "THINspirational Speaker." He now works with people and organizations facing challenging times and increased workloads to lower conflict, improve communication, and reduce stress so they'll be happier, healthier, and more productive. In addition to speaking across the country, Scott has a weekly syndicated column, "Striving for Imprefection," since 2004; he is the past president of the Northern California chapter of the National Speakers Association, author of seven books; and the CRP (Chief Recovering Perfectionist) of ThisTimeIMeanIt.com, a site to empower you to make the changes you've been meaning to make for way too long. His playful, content-rich, inspirational presentations have been described as a "cross between business 101, group therapy, and a southern revival." (He does however request that you do not watch what he eats – and he won't watch what you eat.)

Mary Meinig, MSW

Mary Meinig has served with the Office of Family and Children Ombudsman since it opened in 1997 and has been the Director since January 2002.  Prior to joining OFCO, Ms. Meinig maintained a successful clinical and consulting practice specializing in treating abused and traumatized children and their families. Her previous experience includes working in special education, child protective services and children's residential treatment settings. Ms. Meinig is nationally known for her work developing Family Resolution Therapy, a protocol for the long term management of relationships in abusive families. She is frequently asked to present her work at national conferences, and has authored several professional publications on this topic. Ms. Meinig is a graduate of Central Washington University, and received a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Washington. She is a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker and member of the Academy of Certified Social Workers.

Laura Merchant, MSW, LICSW

Laura Merchant is the Assistant Director at Harborview Center for Sexual Assault & Traumatic Stress (HCSATS), where she has worked since 1985.  She previously served as Director of its Education & Training Program, & coordinated the counseling program & staff professional development.  Her current responsibilities include providing professional case consultation & planning and presenting training on state-of-the-art investigative interviewing of children, as well as trauma treatment issues, throughout North America.

Colette McCully, M.Ed

Rebecca Milliman, MSW

Rebecca Milliman received her B.A. in Sociology from the University of Virginia and her Master of Social Work from the University of Washington.   She now works as the Prevention and Education Coordinator at Harborview Children’s Response Center.   Rebecca works with professionals, parents, and youth to create safer communities and enhance the protection of children from abuse and violence.  She is a co-founder of the Violence Prevention Coalition and co-author of the F.L.A.S.H. (Family Life and Sexual Health) curriculum.

LeaAnn Miyagawa, RN, MN

LeaAnn Miyagawa currently serves as trainer for the Promoting First Relationships Program. Her graduate work focused on cross-cultural and perinatal frameworks. She regularly trains providers on topics of perinatal and child health, social-emotional health, child development, parenting coaching, and relationship development. LeaAnn also trains community providers who work with diverse families. LeaAnn has worked for over twenty years in public health parent-child health settings with vulnerable families.

Martin Mueller, MPA

Martin Mueller is Assistant Superintendent for Student Support for the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI).  Prior to his appointment to this position in October 2006, he was OSPI’s Director of Learning and Teaching Support for five years, and has also supervised various OSPI school health and safety and extended learning programs.  He has been at OSPI since 1996.  Before coming to OSPI, Mr. Mueller coordinated school safety and prevention programs at Educational Service District 123 in Pasco, WA, and also provided direct student support services to several schools in Southeast Washington.  Prior to that, he was the chief administrator of a small hospital in Southern Idaho that specialized in substance abuse and psychiatric care.  He has a Master’s Degree in Public Administration.

Jill Murphy, LICSW

Jill Murphy is the Program Supervisor of King County’s Family Treatment Court, a therapeutic court approach designed to assist chemically dependent parents who have lost custody of their children. Mrs. Murphy graduated from the University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration with a Master of Arts degree in Clinical Social Work and is licensed in Washington State. Through Catholic Charities Foster Care Division in Chicago, she conducted group, individual, and family therapy with mentally ill adults and adolescents involved with the Department of Children and Family Services. At Family Support America, Mrs. Murphy developed an interactive computerized network of national resources and agencies designed to support family efforts to raise healthy children. As a Juvenile Justice Clinical Coordinator for the Cook County Juvenile Court Clinic (CCJCC), Mrs. Murphy facilitated requests for clinical information, provided court-wide training on CCJCC’s model and evaluated parents for ability to surrender their parental rights. She acted as a consultant to the State of Connecticut on the CCJCC model.  She was the Supervisor for the Midwest Regional Learning Collaborative through the National Child Traumatic Stress Network and facilitated trauma and grief group therapy through Project Renew (the female offenders division of the Cook County Juvenile Court Probation Department).   In 2008, Mrs. Murphy traveled to Malawi to train Paralegal Advisory Services to interview traumatized prisoners and she conducted mental health evaluations for incarcerated men and women. She has co-authored several national presentations at conferences focused on drug courts, legal services, juvenile justice, and psychology.

Michael O’Connell, PhD, MSW

Michael O’Connell’s introduction to social service work began in 1974, when he served as director of a Navy Correctional Center – i.e. the brig.  He got his MSW from the University of Washington, intending to continue his career in correctional administration, but lost his way and ended up as a therapist doing inpatient substance abuse treatment.  He began a private practice in 1980.  In 1981, desperate for referrals, he began to work with sex offenders (note element of dry humor, here.)  He continues that work, today.  Along the way he earned a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology at the University of Washington, including doing research on using polygraph testing with sex offenders.  He co-authored a book, “Working With Sex Offenders” which outlines standards of practice for community-based treatment of sex offenders.

Sean O'Donnell, JD

Stacey Patton, PhD

Ashley Penney, M.Ed

Michael Pullmann, PhD

Michael Pullmann is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Public Behavioral Health and Justice Policy in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine. His primary research interest focuses on community-based participatory research approaches in children’s mental health services and juvenile justice, especially family involvement in guiding policy and practice. His also studies approaches to cross-system collaboration for serving families with complex needs, longitudinal approaches to data analysis, and the utilization of large management information databases in research. He has presented at dozens of conferences on topics such as children’s mental health, approaches to community based evaluation, juvenile and adult justice, and methodological approaches to the analysis of administrative datasets.

Neale Rasmussen, BS

Dorothy Roberts, JD

Dorothy Roberts is the Kirkland & Ellis Professor at Northwestern University School of Law, with joint appointments in the Departments of African American Studies and Sociology (by courtesy) and as faculty fellow of the Institute for Policy Research. She has written and lectured extensively on the interplay of gender, race, and class in legal issues concerning child welfare, reproduction, and bioethics.  She is the author of the award-winning Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty (1997) and Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare (2002) and more than 70 articles in books and scholarly journals, including Harvard Law Review, Yale Law Journal, and Stanford Law Review, as well as co-editor of six casebooks and anthologies.  Professor Roberts serves on the Braam Oversight Panel and as chair of the board of directors of the Black Women’s Health Imperative. Her latest book, Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-first Century, was published by The New Press in July 2011.

Deborah Robinson

Deborah Robinson is the Infant Death Specialist for the Northwest Infant Survival & SIDS Alliance (NISSA) and the National Center for child Death Review, Ms. Deborah Robinson is uniquely qualified as a national expert on infant death scene investigations. Recognized for her state and national contributions, Ms. Robinson began participating in 2004 on a Center for Disease Control working group developing national investigation guidelines on sudden and unexplained infant death. The eventual result was the SUIDI (Sudden Unexplained Infant Death Investigation) reporting form. Ms. Robinson assisted in the development of training curricula and materials for use with the SUIDI reporting form, and currently promotes its use through appropriate state and local organizations. She also participated in the first national training academy for Sudden Unexplained Infant Deaths and continues to provide training assistance to this group.

Carrie Roderick, BA

Jennifer Romich

Jennifer Romich is an Associate Professor of Social Welfare at the University of Washington. Romich studies resources and economic in families, with a particular emphasis on low income workers, household budgets and families' interactions with public policy. Her recent poverty-related projects include ongoing research into effective marginal tax rates created by means-tested benefit schedules and the tax system; a study of the effects of highway tolls on low-income households; research into financial services used by low-income consumers; and a mixed-methods investigation of income of families involved with the child welfare system.

Romich is the Associate Director of the West Coast Poverty Center and an active member of the University of Washington's Center for Studies of Demography and Ecology. She teaches policy and policy practice classes.

Romich holds bachelors and masters degrees in economics and earned a PhD in Human Development and Social Policy from Northwestern University.

Stacey Shaw-Welch, PhD

Stacy Shaw Welch, Ph.D. Dr. Welch is the founder and Director of the Anxiety and Stress Reduction Center of Seattle (ASRC), an outpatient specialty clinic that serves over 250 children, adolescents and adults suffering from anxiety and stress-related problems. The ASRC is part of a larger center specializing in evidence-based treatment for mental health issues called the Evidence Based Treatment Centers of Seattle, which Dr. Welch also oversees. In addition to her clinical practice specializing in anxiety disorders, she is part of the clinical faculty of the University of Washington Depts. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Psychology. Her research activities include recent work on a study on treatment of anxiety disorders in primary care settings (the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management, or "CALM" study), the largest study to date of its kind. She has received funding for her research from the National Institute of Mental Health and the Ford Foundation. Recent and upcoming publications include work in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Depression and Anxiety, and JAMA. She is also active in training and consulting with other professionals, and is part of the training arm of CHAMMP (the Center for Healthcare Improvement for Addictions, Mental Illness, and Medically Vulnerable Populations), a center of emphasis at Harborview Medical Center.

Toni Sebastian

Ed Smart

Leah Stajduhar

Acting Chief of the Office of Program and Policy, has been with DSHS for 17 years. She worked in JRA for 2 years and has been with Children's Administration for 15 years. During her 15 years with Children's Administration, Leah has been a case carrying social worker in CPS and CFWS, and supervised all program areas while assigned to the Lewis County DCFS office. She began working at headquarters in 2005, supervising the Safety Unit in Program and Practice Improvement. For the past two years Leah has been in her current position as Acting Chief of the Office of Program and Policy. The Office of Program and Policy is responsible for the creation and upkeep of the policy manuals, implementation of legislation and new programs as well as helping guide practice. Leah currently leads the implementation of the new Child Safety Framework.

Judith Stanger Houck, MA, LMHC, CDP, NCC, WCSAP Certified, and EAGALA Certified Equine Assisted Psychotherapist

Judy Stanger Houck is a member of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe of Idaho and a Colville Lakes Band Descendent. Judy utilizes solution focused experiential approaches in her therapy.

Judy has added Equine Assisted Psychotherapy to her practice because she has found that the horse brings a dimension to the therapy process that reassures the client/s almost immediately that they have a relationship with the horse they trust. Why Horses? Horses offer strength, intelligence, trust, loyalty, hope and encouragement to anyone. People attach to their principles and become more open and willing. Like people, each horse brings their own personality into a relationship. A person is accepted on that person's level of trust, confidence, awareness, and skills. Therefore, a horse will often teach us what we need to learn to change to succeed in our personal relationships.

Linda Cordisco Steele, M.Ed

Linda is Curriculum Chair and Senior Trainer for the National Children’s Advocacy Center (NCAC).  As a trainer for the NCAC, Linda has conducted more than 300 trainings across the U.S. and abroad.  She has presented workshops at local, regional, state, national and international child abuse conferences.  Her areas of expertise include child forensic interviewing, child development, victim advocacy, and working within the multidisciplinary team setting.  In addition to training, Linda currently conducts forensic interviews at CACs in Kentucky and Alabama.  Linda has previously served as Clinical Director and as a forensic interviewer for three Children’s Advocacy Centers: the Prescott House CAC in Birmingham, Alabama; the National Children’s Advocacy Center in Huntsville, Alabama; and The Safehouse in Albuquerque, New Mexico.  While in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Linda served as the Project Director of the Mobile Interviewing Project, which serves the Navajo Nation and Zuni Pueblo, and is a program of All Faiths Receiving Home in Albuquerque.  She has also served as Clinical Director, Director of Victim Services, and Acting Executive Director of the Crisis Center of Jefferson County in Alabama.  Linda has 25 years of experience in therapy and advocacy work with victims and extensive training experience regionally and nationally.  Linda received her Master’s in Education from the University of Pittsburgh and is a Licensed Professional Counselor.

Paul Stern, JD

Paul Stern is a senior deputy prosecuting attorney for Snohomish County, Washington.  He has been a prosecutor since 1981.

Mr. Stern served on the Boards of Directors for the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers from 2003-2005, and for the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children from 1991-1997. He is past-president of the Washington Professional Society on the Abuse of Children.

He is currently an Advisor to the DSM-V Paraphilia Disorders Work Group.  Mr. Stern served on the Sexual Offender Treatment Provider Advisory Committee, which oversees those who treat sex offenders in the community; and  as Vice-Chair of the Twin Rivers Sex Offender Treatment Program Advisory Committee, which is the treatment program within the Washington State prison system.  He was also appointed to the Governor’s DNA Oversight Committee.

He has served as legal editor for the APSAC Advisor, Violence Update and is on the editorial board of Child Maltreatment.  He has published more than a dozen articles on issues related to the prosecution of child abuse. His book, Preparing and Presenting Expert Testimony in Child Abuse Litigation was published by Sage in 1997. He also wrote a manual for the Prosecution of Sexual Assault Cases in 1997, dealing predominately with assaults upon adult victims.

He has lectured at professional conferences on issues of physical abuse, child abuse, interpersonal violence, the effective use of expert witnesses  and the application of  empirically based practice, in 37 states, plus Canada, Ireland, Scotland, England, Australia, South Africa and Chile.

A graduate of Ithaca College and Rutgers-Camden Law School, Mr. Stern was admitted to practice law in New Jersey (now resigned), in Washington, and before the United States Supreme Court.

Robin Talley, M.Ed

Robin Talley, M.Ed, BCBA, is a Behavioral and Educational Consultant at the UW Autism Center. She has provided services to children with autism spectrum disorders since 1999. She received her M.Ed. and teaching license from the University of Washington in 2004 and became a board certified behavior analyst in 2005.

During graduate school Robin completed her practicum training and student teaching at the Experimental Education Unit and worked as an ABA therepist at the UW Autism Center. After completing graduate school she transitioned into an Early Childhood Autism Consultant position at the UW Autism Center. In 2006 Robin moved to Denver and began working at The Joshua School, a private school for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. While at The Joshua School she created and directed an early intervention program and served as the educational director for the school-aged program. She has experience in early intervention, functional behavior assessment, and applied behavior analysis.

Giovanna Taormina

Giovanna Taormina is the Executive Director and Co-Founder of Girls Circle Association.  She provides national training, materials, consultation, and technical assistance related to female responsive services to non-profit agencies, government, state supported programs, institutions, and systems that work with adolescent girls, and is a national consultant to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.  She has extensive experience in the design, development and implementation of program services for girls and is recognized for her work on gender-responsive services in both the public and private sectors.   She has co-developed a comprehensive, integrated, female-responsive model to address the risk factors and needs of adolescent girls in a format that is conducive to building on girls’ strengths and developing resiliency.

Kathy Taylor, MD

Stefanie Thomas, BA

Stefanie Thomas has been a victim advocate on ICAC (internet crimes against children) for the past two years. She manages a caseload involving child pornography and juvenile prostitution cases as well as the public outreach. She has given over 300 presentations to schools, community members, groups on the topic of Internet safety. Prior to that, she worked at the Snohomish County Prosecutor's Office in their felony violent crime unit. Stefanie graduated from UW with a BA in law, society and justice. Stefanie is state and nationally certified to do forensic child interviewing.

Det. Thompson

Patti Toth, JD

Patti Toth is the Child Abuse Program Manager for Washington State’s Criminal Justice Training Commission where she is responsible for development and delivery of WA State’s “Child Abuse Investigation & Interviewing” course.  Patti started her career in 1980 as a WA State prosecutor, where she tried numerous child abuse and sexual assault cases.   She then served 8 years as the first Director of NDAA’s National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse, and later worked as a trial attorney in the Child Exploitation Section of the US Department of Justice in Washington, DC.   Patti provides training throughout the US and in other countries.  She is active in the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC), served as its 1994 national president, and currently manages APSAC’s Child Forensic Interview Clinics.  She is also active in the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN) and previously served on its Executive Council.  Patti is co-author of the WA State Child Interview Guide and developed WA State’s “CPOD Guidelines for First Responders to Child Fatalities and Serious Physical Abuse.”  In 2008, she received the J. Pat Finley Child Protection Lifetime Achievement Award.

Betsy Tulee, MSW

Betsy Tulee began her social work career in 1988 working for United Indians of All Tribes Foundation as a social worker, foster home licensor and community advocate, serving the American Indian/Alaskan Native population in the Puget Sound area. She then started her work with DSHS in 1992 as a Child Protection Services (CPS) Social Worker in the Native American Unit in Seattle. After working in CPS for five years, Betsy served in various capacities for DSHS including as a Children's Administration (CA) Academy Trainer, a Program Manager and a Social Work Supervisor. She is currently working as an Indian Child Welfare Program Manager in CA headquarters. Throughout her career, Betsy has worked closely with Tribes from Canada and the U.S. to support them in protecting their children and families.

Kitty Tyrol

Kitty Tyrol is the Senior Training Manager of Girls Circle Association has diverse experience in Youth Program Development, Staff Development & Training, and Quality Assurance. She previously served as a Consultant/ Trainer for the State of Connecticut Judicial Branch and Department of Children and Families.  She has trains Probation, Parole, and Detention staff, as well as community-based service providers in a wide array of evidence-based curricula and risk reduction approaches. Ms. Tyrol also trains Strength-Based Approach; Female Responsive Strategies; Motivational Interviewing; Cultural Competency; and Ethics and Boundaries. As co-founder of CT Girls Consortium and in serving various advisory committees, Ms. Tyrol is an advocate for gender equity and gender justice throughout social services - seeking collaborations and opportunities wherein the voices and experiences of girls and women influence change in service delivery models.

April VanGesen

Rudy Verschoor, JD

Special Agent Steve Vienneau

Brenda Villarreal, MSW

Brenda Villarreal, MSW is the Screening and Assessment Program Manager for the Children’s Administration. Brenda has 11 years working for Children’s Administration as a Child Protective Service social worker, a regional Adoption Support Program Manager, and a regional Child Health and Education Tracking (CHET) Specialist. In her current role as the Screening and Assessment Program Manager, she oversees the statewide CHET Program.

Det. Lindsey Wade

Michelle Ressa Weber, JD

Michelle Ressa Weber was appointed to the Spokane County Superior Court bench in May 2007. Before that, she spent a year as the Superior Court Commissioner in Grant County.

Commissioner Ressa was born and raised in Spokane and graduated from the University of Washington in 1992 with a degree in Political Science. She graduated, cum laude, in 1996 from Gonzaga University School of Law. Commissioner Ressa has spent her entire legal career working in the field of child welfare. Appointed in 1996 by then Attorney General Christine Gregoire, Ms. Ressa represented the Department of Social and Health Services in dependency, termination and licensing actions in Thurston, Lewis, and Mason Counties. She also represented DSHS in King County for several years before taking a position representing Children's Administration Headquarters in 2002. Commissioner Ressa also represented DSHS in civil Tort cases for two years before her appointment to the bench.

Ms. Ressa has conducted numerous hours of training for the courts, the Department, the Attorney General's office and the child welfare community. She has consistently showed her dedication and passion for children and families navigating their way through a complicated, emotional, and financially challenging legal system.

Currently Commissioner Ressa is the judicial officer assigned to the Indian Child Welfare Team in Spokane County Juvenile Court. Her dependency caseload consists only of Native children and their families.

Lisa West

Lisa West is the mother of four children, three that walk, and one that flies. She is a board member of the Stark County Safe Sleep Task Force. Ms. West has been interviewed locally and nationally appearing on MSNBC and CNN. She has presented at First Candle's SIDS Symposium and the Tennessee's child death review conference. Ms. West testified in front of the House of Representatives in Pennsylvania on behalf of House Bill 47 and lobbied in D.C. for passage of Senate Bill 1862, Stillbirth and Sudden Unexplained Infant Death Prevention, Education, and Awareness Act. The bill was sponsored by Senator Frank Lautenberg.

Ms. West is the co-founder of PAUSE (Parents Against Unsafe Sleep Environments) on Facebook. She teaches the importance of a safe sleep environment at the local pregnancy support center, the Early Integration through Head Start program, Mother Mentor's teen mom group, Social Worker's Network, cribs for kids' classes and court ordered parenting classes. Ms. West is a trainer with the State of Ohio Infant Death Scene Investigation and also provides local training in Stark County.

Ms. West is attending college full time pursuing a degree in Human and Social Services, as well as working at a counseling and wellness center.

Martina Whelshula, PhD

Dr. Martina Whelshula is a member of the Arrow Lakes Nation of the Colville Indian Reservation. Her educational and experiential background is diverse and focuses primarily in the field of education and healing. She possesses a doctoral degree in Traditional Knowledge, a Master of Arts degree in Counseling Psychology, and a Chemical Dependency Professional Trainee.

Dr. Whelshula has worked extensively with Native American communities nation-wide in the areas of local and national policy development, education, community mobilization, and healing.

She has served as the Chair pro-tem for the Washington State Native American Education Advisory Committee with the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, a member of the Washington State Native American Think Tank, member of the Washington State Multi-Ethnic Think Tank, Washington State Board of Education's Equity Committee and was appointed by Washington State Governor Christine Gregoire as Trustee to the Evergreen State College Board of Trustees and the Governor's P-20 Council.

Dr. Whelshula's professional experience has ranged from Research Director for national health policy development for Congressional review, to P-12 native language instructor in the public school system, tribal Head Start Director and President of the Spokane Tribal College. She is an educator, therapist, and organizational consultant.

Dr. Whelshula is currently Executive Director for the Healing Lodge of the Seven Nations, a residential treatment center for alcohol and drug addicted youth. In 2012, the Healing Lodge received an Honorable Mention from the National iAward for innovative programming in behavioral healthcare, Washington Co-Occurring Disorders and Treatment Conference's Innovative Program of the Year, and 2nd Place Winner in the national MusiCares and GRAMMY Foundation's Teen Substance Abuse Awareness Contest.

Rebecca Wiester, MD

 

Martin Mueller, MPA

Martin Mueller is Assistant Superintendent for Student Support for the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI).  Prior to his appointment to this position in October 2006, he was OSPI’s Director of Learning and Teaching Support for five years, and has also supervised various OSPI school health and safety and extended learning programs.  He has been at OSPI since 1996.  Before coming to OSPI, Mr. Mueller coordinated school safety and prevention programs at Educational Service District 123 in Pasco, WA, and also provided direct student support services to several schools in Southeast Washington.  Prior to that, he was the chief administrator of a small hospital in Southern Idaho that specialized in substance abuse and psychiatric care.  He has a Master’s Degree in Public Administration.

Jill Murphy, LICSW

Jill Murphy is the Program Supervisor of King County’s Family Treatment Court, a therapeutic court approach designed to assist chemically dependent parents who have lost custody of their children. Mrs. Murphy graduated from the University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration with a Master of Arts degree in Clinical Social Work and is licensed in Washington State. Through Catholic Charities Foster Care Division in Chicago, she conducted group, individual, and family therapy with mentally ill adults and adolescents involved with the Department of Children and Family Services. At Family Support America, Mrs. Murphy developed an interactive computerized network of national resources and agencies designed to support family efforts to raise healthy children. As a Juvenile Justice Clinical Coordinator for the Cook County Juvenile Court Clinic (CCJCC), Mrs. Murphy facilitated requests for clinical information, provided court-wide training on CCJCC’s model and evaluated parents for ability to surrender their parental rights. She acted as a consultant to the State of Connecticut on the CCJCC model.  She was the Supervisor for the Midwest Regional Learning Collaborative through the National Child Traumatic Stress Network and facilitated trauma and grief group therapy through Project Renew (the female offenders division of the Cook County Juvenile Court Probation Department).   In 2008, Mrs. Murphy traveled to Malawi to train Paralegal Advisory Services to interview traumatized prisoners and she conducted mental health evaluations for incarcerated men and women. She has co-authored several national presentations at conferences focused on drug courts, legal services, juvenile justice, and psychology.

Michael O’Connell, PhD, MSW

Michael O’Connell’s introduction to social service work began in 1974, when he served as director of a Navy Correctional Center – i.e. the brig.  He got his MSW from the University of Washington, intending to continue his career in correctional administration, but lost his way and ended up as a therapist doing inpatient substance abuse treatment.  He began a private practice in 1980.  In 1981, desperate for referrals, he began to work with sex offenders (note element of dry humor, here.)  He continues that work, today.  Along the way he earned a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology at the University of Washington, including doing research on using polygraph testing with sex offenders.  He co-authored a book, “Working With Sex Offenders” which outlines standards of practice for community-based treatment of sex offenders.

Sean O'Donnell, JD

Stacey Patton, PhD

Ashley Penney, M.Ed

Michael Pullmann, PhD

Michael Pullmann is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Public Behavioral Health and Justice Policy in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine. His primary research interest focuses on community-based participatory research approaches in children’s mental health services and juvenile justice, especially family involvement in guiding policy and practice. His also studies approaches to cross-system collaboration for serving families with complex needs, longitudinal approaches to data analysis, and the utilization of large management information databases in research. He has presented at dozens of conferences on topics such as children’s mental health, approaches to community based evaluation, juvenile and adult justice, and methodological approaches to the analysis of administrative datasets.

Neale Rasmussen, BS

Dorothy Roberts, JD

Dorothy Roberts is the Kirkland & Ellis Professor at Northwestern University School of Law, with joint appointments in the Departments of African American Studies and Sociology (by courtesy) and as faculty fellow of the Institute for Policy Research. She has written and lectured extensively on the interplay of gender, race, and class in legal issues concerning child welfare, reproduction, and bioethics.  She is the author of the award-winning Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty (1997) and Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare (2002) and more than 70 articles in books and scholarly journals, including Harvard Law Review, Yale Law Journal, and Stanford Law Review, as well as co-editor of six casebooks and anthologies.  Professor Roberts serves on the Braam Oversight Panel and as chair of the board of directors of the Black Women’s Health Imperative. Her latest book, Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-first Century, was published by The New Press in July 2011.

Deborah Robinson

Deborah Robinson is the Infant Death Specialist for the Northwest Infant Survival & SIDS Alliance (NISSA) and the National Center for child Death Review, Ms. Deborah Robinson is uniquely qualified as a national expert on infant death scene investigations. Recognized for her state and national contributions, Ms. Robinson began participating in 2004 on a Center for Disease Control working group developing national investigation guidelines on sudden and unexplained infant death. The eventual result was the SUIDI (Sudden Unexplained Infant Death Investigation) reporting form. Ms. Robinson assisted in the development of training curricula and materials for use with the SUIDI reporting form, and currently promotes its use through appropriate state and local organizations. She also participated in the first national training academy for Sudden Unexplained Infant Deaths and continues to provide training assistance to this group.

Carrie Roderick, BA

Stacey Shaw-Welch, PhD

Stacy Shaw Welch, Ph.D. Dr. Welch is the founder and Director of the Anxiety and Stress Reduction Center of Seattle (ASRC), an outpatient specialty clinic that serves over 250 children, adolescents and adults suffering from anxiety and stress-related problems. The ASRC is part of a larger center specializing in evidence-based treatment for mental health issues called the Evidence Based Treatment Centers of Seattle, which Dr. Welch also oversees. In addition to her clinical practice specializing in anxiety disorders, she is part of the clinical faculty of the University of Washington Depts. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Psychology. Her research activities include recent work on a study on treatment of anxiety disorders in primary care settings (the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management, or "CALM" study), the largest study to date of its kind. She has received funding for her research from the National Institute of Mental Health and the Ford Foundation. Recent and upcoming publications include work in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Depression and Anxiety, and JAMA. She is also active in training and consulting with other professionals, and is part of the training arm of CHAMMP (the Center for Healthcare Improvement for Addictions, Mental Illness, and Medically Vulnerable Populations), a center of emphasis at Harborview Medical Center.

Toni Sebastian

Ed Smart

Leah Stajduhar

Acting Chief of the Office of Program and Policy, has been with DSHS for 17 years. She worked in JRA for 2 years and has been with Children's Administration for 15 years. During her 15 years with Children's Administration, Leah has been a case carrying social worker in CPS and CFWS, and supervised all program areas while assigned to the Lewis County DCFS office. She began working at headquarters in 2005, supervising the Safety Unit in Program and Practice Improvement. For the past two years Leah has been in her current position as Acting Chief of the Office of Program and Policy. The Office of Program and Policy is responsible for the creation and upkeep of the policy manuals, implementation of legislation and new programs as well as helping guide practice. Leah currently leads the implementation of the new Child Safety Framework.

Judith Stanger-Houck

Linda Cordisco Steele, M.Ed  

Linda is Curriculum Chair and Senior Trainer for the National Children’s Advocacy Center (NCAC).  As a trainer for the NCAC, Linda has conducted more than 300 trainings across the U.S. and abroad.  She has presented workshops at local, regional, state, national and international child abuse conferences.  Her areas of expertise include child forensic interviewing, child development, victim advocacy, and working within the multidisciplinary team setting.  In addition to training, Linda currently conducts forensic interviews at CACs in Kentucky and Alabama.  Linda has previously served as Clinical Director and as a forensic interviewer for three Children’s Advocacy Centers: the Prescott House CAC in Birmingham, Alabama; the National Children’s Advocacy Center in Huntsville, Alabama; and The Safehouse in Albuquerque, New Mexico.  While in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Linda served as the Project Director of the Mobile Interviewing Project, which serves the Navajo Nation and Zuni Pueblo, and is a program of All Faiths Receiving Home in Albuquerque.  She has also served as Clinical Director, Director of Victim Services, and Acting Executive Director of the Crisis Center of Jefferson County in Alabama.  Linda has 25 years of experience in therapy and advocacy work with victims and extensive training experience regionally and nationally.  Linda received her Master’s in Education from the University of Pittsburgh and is a Licensed Professional Counselor.

Paul Stern, JD

Paul Stern is a senior deputy prosecuting attorney for Snohomish County, Washington.  He has been a prosecutor since 1981.

Mr. Stern served on the Boards of Directors for the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers from 2003-2005, and for the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children from 1991-1997. He is past-president of the Washington Professional Society on the Abuse of Children.

He is currently an Advisor to the DSM-V Paraphilia Disorders Work Group.  Mr. Stern served on the Sexual Offender Treatment Provider Advisory Committee, which oversees those who treat sex offenders in the community; and  as Vice-Chair of the Twin Rivers Sex Offender Treatment Program Advisory Committee, which is the treatment program within the Washington State prison system.  He was also appointed to the Governor’s DNA Oversight Committee.

He has served as legal editor for the APSAC Advisor, Violence Update and is on the editorial board of Child Maltreatment.  He has published more than a dozen articles on issues related to the prosecution of child abuse. His book, Preparing and Presenting Expert Testimony in Child Abuse Litigation was published by Sage in 1997. He also wrote a manual for the Prosecution of Sexual Assault Cases in 1997, dealing predominately with assaults upon adult victims.

He has lectured at professional conferences on issues of physical abuse, child abuse, interpersonal violence, the effective use of expert witnesses  and the application of  empirically based practice, in 37 states, plus Canada, Ireland, Scotland, England, Australia, South Africa and Chile.

A graduate of Ithaca College and Rutgers-Camden Law School, Mr. Stern was admitted to practice law in New Jersey (now resigned), in Washington, and before the United States Supreme Court.

David Stillman

David Stillman is the Assistant Secretary of the Economic Services Administration in Washington State's Department of Social and Health Services where he is responsible for the State's public assistance programs as well as child support enforcement, financial recovery, and disability determination for social security benefits. David oversees more than 4,200 employees, 80 offices, and a $2.3 billion budget with a focus on transforming government to better serve families in need.

Prior to accepting his current position, David served for over five years as Director of the Department's Division of Child Support (DCS), and assumed the Director role for the Office of Financial Recovery (OFR) on December 1, 2009. In this capacity, he provided oversight for administrative and policy operations for an organization comprised of 1,100 employees, 11 offices, with annual child support collections of almost $700 million and financial recoveries of approximately $500 million. Combined, DCS and OFR contribute approximately $1.3 billion annually to help ensure the safety and health of customers, families, communities and the state itself.

David participates as a presenter at a variety of national and state conferences and serves on a wide variety of national and state work groups and committees. David will serve as the National Child Support Enforcement Association (NCSEA) President beginning August 2011. He is also a Western Interstate Child Support Enforcement Council (WICSEC) board member and a Past President of WICSEC.

Among his achievements, David is a 2001 recipient of the Governor's Distinguished Manager award, the highest recognition for a state government manager, received the WICSEC Individual Achievement Award in 2004, and was named to the WICSEC Presenter Hall of Fame in 2011.

David received his B.A. from Whitman College and his J. D. from the University Of Puget Sound School Of Law.

Robin Talley, M.Ed

Robin Talley, M.Ed, BCBA, is a Behavioral and Educational Consultant at the UW Autism Center. She has provided services to children with autism spectrum disorders since 1999. She received her M.Ed. and teaching license from the University of Washington in 2004 and became a board certified behavior analyst in 2005.

During graduate school Robin completed her practicum training and student teaching at the Experimental Education Unit and worked as an ABA therepist at the UW Autism Center. After completing graduate school she transitioned into an Early Childhood Autism Consultant position at the UW Autism Center. In 2006 Robin moved to Denver and began working at The Joshua School, a private school for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. While at The Joshua School she created and directed an early intervention program and served as the educational director for the school-aged program. She has experience in early intervention, functional behavior assessment, and applied behavior analysis.

Giovanna Taormina

Giovanna Taormina is the Executive Director and Co-Founder of Girls Circle Association.  She provides national training, materials, consultation, and technical assistance related to female responsive services to non-profit agencies, government, state supported programs, institutions, and systems that work with adolescent girls, and is a national consultant to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.  She has extensive experience in the design, development and implementation of program services for girls and is recognized for her work on gender-responsive services in both the public and private sectors.   She has co-developed a comprehensive, integrated, female-responsive model to address the risk factors and needs of adolescent girls in a format that is conducive to building on girls’ strengths and developing resiliency.

Kathy Taylor, MD

Stefanie Thomas, BA

Stefanie Thomas has been a victim advocate on ICAC (internet crimes against children) for the past two years. She manages a caseload involving child pornography and juvenile prostitution cases as well as the public outreach. She has given over 300 presentations to schools, community members, groups on the topic of Internet safety. Prior to that, she worked at the Snohomish County Prosecutor's Office in their felony violent crime unit. Stefanie graduated from UW with a BA in law, society and justice. Stefanie is state and nationally certified to do forensic child interviewing.

Det. Thompson

Patti Toth, JD

Patti Toth is the Child Abuse Program Manager for Washington State’s Criminal Justice Training Commission where she is responsible for development and delivery of WA State’s “Child Abuse Investigation & Interviewing” course.  Patti started her career in 1980 as a WA State prosecutor, where she tried numerous child abuse and sexual assault cases.   She then served 8 years as the first Director of NDAA’s National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse, and later worked as a trial attorney in the Child Exploitation Section of the US Department of Justice in Washington, DC.   Patti provides training throughout the US and in other countries.  She is active in the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC), served as its 1994 national president, and currently manages APSAC’s Child Forensic Interview Clinics.  She is also active in the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN) and previously served on its Executive Council.  Patti is co-author of the WA State Child Interview Guide and developed WA State’s “CPOD Guidelines for First Responders to Child Fatalities and Serious Physical Abuse.”  In 2008, she received the J. Pat Finley Child Protection Lifetime Achievement Award.  

Betsy Tulee, MSW

Betsy Tulee began her social work career in 1988 working for United Indians of All Tribes Foundation as a social worker, foster home licensor and community advocate, serving the American Indian/Alaskan Native population in the Puget Sound area. She then started her work with DSHS in 1992 as a Child Protection Services (CPS) Social Worker in the Native American Unit in Seattle. After working in CPS for five years, Betsy served in various capacities for DSHS including as a Children's Administration (CA) Academy Trainer, a Program Manager and a Social Work Supervisor. She is currently working as an Indian Child Welfare Program Manager in CA headquarters. Throughout her career, Betsy has worked closely with Tribes from Canada and the U.S. to support them in protecting their children and families.

Kitty Tyrol

Kitty Tyrol is the Senior Training Manager of Girls Circle Association has diverse experience in Youth Program Development, Staff Development & Training, and Quality Assurance. She previously served as a Consultant/ Trainer for the State of Connecticut Judicial Branch and Department of Children and Families.  She has trains Probation, Parole, and Detention staff, as well as community-based service providers in a wide array of evidence-based curricula and risk reduction approaches. Ms. Tyrol also trains Strength-Based Approach; Female Responsive Strategies; Motivational Interviewing; Cultural Competency; and Ethics and Boundaries. As co-founder of CT Girls Consortium and in serving various advisory committees, Ms. Tyrol is an advocate for gender equity and gender justice throughout social services - seeking collaborations and opportunities wherein the voices and experiences of girls and women influence change in service delivery models.

April VanGesen

Rudy Verschoor, JD

Special Agent Steve Vienneau

Brenda Villarreal, MSW

Brenda Villarreal, MSW is the Screening and Assessment Program Manager for the Children’s Administration. Brenda has 11 years working for Children’s Administration as a Child Protective Service social worker, a regional Adoption Support Program Manager, and a regional Child Health and Education Tracking (CHET) Specialist. In her current role as the Screening and Assessment Program Manager, she oversees the statewide CHET Program.

Det. Lindsey Wade

Michelle Ressa Weber, JD

Michelle Ressa Weber was appointed to the Spokane County Superior Court bench in May 2007. Before that, she spent a year as the Superior Court Commissioner in Grant County.

Commissioner Ressa was born and raised in Spokane and graduated from the University of Washington in 1992 with a degree in Political Science. She graduated, cum laude, in 1996 from Gonzaga University School of Law. Commissioner Ressa has spent her entire legal career working in the field of child welfare. Appointed in 1996 by then Attorney General Christine Gregoire, Ms. Ressa represented the Department of Social and Health Services in dependency, termination and licensing actions in Thurston, Lewis, and Mason Counties. She also represented DSHS in King County for several years before taking a position representing Children's Administration Headquarters in 2002. Commissioner Ressa also represented DSHS in civil Tort cases for two years before her appointment to the bench.

Ms. Ressa has conducted numerous hours of training for the courts, the Department, the Attorney General's office and the child welfare community. She has consistently showed her dedication and passion for children and families navigating their way through a complicated, emotional, and financially challenging legal system.

Currently Commissioner Ressa is the judicial officer assigned to the Indian Child Welfare Team in Spokane County Juvenile Court. Her dependency caseload consists only of Native children and their families.

Lisa West

Lisa West is the mother of four children, three that walk, and one that flies. She is a board member of the Stark County Safe Sleep Task Force. Ms. West has been interviewed locally and nationally appearing on MSNBC and CNN. She has presented at First Candle's SIDS Symposium and the Tennessee's child death review conference. Ms. West testified in front of the House of Representatives in Pennsylvania on behalf of House Bill 47 and lobbied in D.C. for passage of Senate Bill 1862, Stillbirth and Sudden Unexplained Infant Death Prevention, Education, and Awareness Act. The bill was sponsored by Senator Frank Lautenberg.

Ms. West is the co-founder of PAUSE (Parents Against Unsafe Sleep Environments) on Facebook. She teaches the importance of a safe sleep environment at the local pregnancy support center, the Early Integration through Head Start program, Mother Mentor's teen mom group, Social Worker's Network, cribs for kids' classes and court ordered parenting classes. Ms. West is a trainer with the State of Ohio Infant Death Scene Investigation and also provides local training in Stark County.

Ms. West is attending college full time pursuing a degree in Human and Social Services, as well as working at a counseling and wellness center.

Martina Whelshula, PhD

Dr. Martina Whelshula is a member of the Arrow Lakes Nation of the Colville Indian Reservation. Her educational and experiential background is diverse and focuses primarily in the field of education and healing. She possesses a doctoral degree in Traditional Knowledge, a Master of Arts degree in Counseling Psychology, and a Chemical Dependency Professional Trainee. 

Dr. Whelshula has worked extensively with Native American communities nation-wide in the areas of local and national policy development, education, community mobilization, and healing.

She has served as the Chair pro-tem for the Washington State Native American Education Advisory Committee with the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, a member of the Washington State Native American Think Tank, member of the Washington State Multi-Ethnic Think Tank, Washington State Board of Education's Equity Committee and was appointed by Washington State Governor Christine Gregoire as Trustee to the Evergreen State College Board of Trustees and the Governor's P-20 Council.

Dr. Whelshula's professional experience has ranged from Research Director for national health policy development for Congressional review, to P-12 native language instructor in the public school system, tribal Head Start Director and President of the Spokane Tribal College. She is an educator, therapist, and organizational consultant.

Dr. Whelshula is currently Executive Director for the Healing Lodge of the Seven Nations, a residential treatment center for alcohol and drug addicted youth. In 2012, the Healing Lodge received an Honorable Mention from the National iAward for innovative programming in behavioral healthcare, Washington Co-Occurring Disorders and Treatment Conference's Innovative Program of the Year, and 2nd Place Winner in the national MusiCares and GRAMMY Foundation's Teen Substance Abuse Awareness Contest.

Rebecca Wiester, MD

 

Rob Wyman

Attorney ROB WYMAN graduated from Willamette University in 1991 and worked for the Oregon and Washington State Juvenile Corrections systems from 1990 through 1996. He received his JD and MSW from the University of Denver in 2000. While earning his MSW, Rob interned as a DV victim advocate and treatment provider for men convicted of domestic violence offenses, and as a family therapist through Denver Children's Home. For two and a half years, as a law student, he interned for the Rocky Mountain Children's Law Center. Rob was hired into the dependency division at The Defender Association in Seattle in December 2000, worked for several years in criminal units in the office, and then was hired as the supervisor of the Dependency Division since May 2005.

 

Rob is the Chair of the Advisory Board at the Children and Youth Advocacy Center at the University of Washington Law School, a member of the King County Racial Disproportionality Coalition, is on the Advisory Board at the (soon to be renamed ) Office of African American Children's Services, and is a member of the National Association of Counsel for Children. Rob currently supervises eight attorneys who represent parents and children in the dependency system in King County. His office also represents children in At-Risk Youth, CHINS, and truancy cases.